Seat map Airbus A330-300 “Air Canada”. Best seats in the plane

Seat map Airbus A330-300 “Air Canada”. Best seats in the plane


Air Canada operates 2 versions of Airbus A330-300.

First cabin version of the Airbus A330-300 (333) V1

Seat_map_Air_Canada_Airbus_A330-300

This airplane may transport 265 passengers in two classes. This version is the most common among two versions operated by Air Canada and is used during long-haul transcontinental flights to Europe.

Business class consists of 37 open suites that are located in 2 sections.

First section has 9 rows of seats per 3 in each.

All A seats of the business class have more privacy as they face a part of the aisle and not the seat of another passenger.

Proximity of the lavatory and galley may represent a problem for passengers of the seats of the 1st row.

The seats 9A and 9K are considered bad seats as they have no windows and close location of the galleys may be bothersome. However passengers of these seats will fell more privacy as there are closets here that are adjacent to these seats.

The second section contains remaining 10 open suites of the business class.

The seat 10A has the following disadvantages: there is no windows here, the closet, galley and main boarding door are located too close to this seat.

Close location of the lavatory will cause discomfort to passengers of the seats 11G and 11K.

Economy class may transport 228 passengers. The seats in the economy class are also divided into two sections. First sections contains 13 rows of seats, most of them have 2-4-2 configuration.

The seats of the 18th row are designated by Air Canada as preferred seats that may be chosen by any passenger for additional fee. Elite members may reserve these seats free of charge. Passengers of the seats 18AC and 18HK may take advantage of extra knee space but not necessarily for the legs.

All the seats of the 18th row have basinet location that is why passengers with babies are often seated here.

The seats 18DEFG are often bumped by other passengers passing by and service carts because of the alignment of these seats.

Close location of the lavatories may cause discomfort for passengers of the seats 29DEFG and of the 30th row. Also these seats may be less reclining because of the bulkhead located behind.

The second section of economy class is located behind exit row and begins with the seats that are designated as preferred seats, these are the seats 34DEFG and the seats 35AC and 35HK. These seats may be reserved by elite members free of charge, other passengers will have to pay extra fee for these seats. Other passengers tend to gather in this area in order to visit lavatories and this fact may cause discomfort to passengers of these seats. At the same time passengers of these seats will take advantage of extra legroom. The seats 34DEFG also have extra space for the knees. However, passengers with infants are often seated here as these seats have bassinet location.

All D seats of this section have restricted storage and leg room due to presence of entertainment equipment here.

As there are no seats behind the seats 45D and 45G are often bumped by other passengers passing by and service carts.

Legroom of the seats 46DFG is limited as they are misaligned with the row in front.

Proximity of the lavatories ad galleys will represent problem for passengers of the seats 49DFG and for passengers of the last 51st row.

Second cabin version of the Airbus A330-300 (333) V2

Seat map Airbus A330-300 Air Canada. Version 2

Second version of Airbus A330 is used also during short domestic flights.

This airplane offers seats of three classes: business, premium economy and economy.

Business class consists of 27 open suites with 180 degrees recline. Business class occupies first 9 rows of seats that have 1-1-1 configuration. All these seats can be transformed in a fully bed. The noise from the galleys and lavatories located in front may cause discomfort to passengers of the seats of the 1st row. The seats of the 9th row have the same disadvantage – location of the galleys behind.

Behind the seats of the business class 21 seats of premium economy class are located. These seats have 7 inches recline. When this airplane is used during the flights within North America these seats are designated by Air Canada as standard economy class seats. The seats of the 12th row are considered good seats as they provide extra legroom. However, these seats have no floor storage during take-off and landing and are a little narrower than standard because the tray tables are built-in the armrests making them immovable.

Economy class may accommodate 244 passengers on the seats that have 4 inches recline.

The seats of the economy class are divided into 2 sections separated from each other with an exit row.

First section consists of 15 rows of seats. There are totally 116 seats here. Most of these seats have 2-4-2 configuration. Passengers of the seats of the 18th row will take advantage of extra legroom. These seats are considered good seats. Among disadvantages of these seats: lack of floor storage during take-off and landing and slightly reduced seat width. For passengers travelling with infants the seats 18DEFG offer bassinet location.

Limited recline and location of the lavatories behind are the main disadvantages of the seats 31DEFG, 32AC and 32HK.

Second section of economy class seats consists of 18 rows with totally 128 seats.

Thanks to the exit row located in front the seats 34DEFG, 35AV and 35HK offer extra space for passengers’ legs. However, these seats have no floor storage during take-off and landing, are a little narrower than standard because the tray tables are in the armrests. Other passengers tend to gather in the area of these seats and of these seats while waiting to use lavatories causing discomfort to passengers of these seats.

The seats 34DEFG offer bassinet locations for passengers travelling with babies.

Protrusion of the exit doors inside is one more disadvantage of the seats 35A and 35K.

Due to awkward transition of the middle seats of the rows 45-46 from 4 to 3 the seats 45D and 45G are often bumped by service carts and other passengers passing by.

Noise from the galleys and lavatories located behind may represent problem to passengers of the seats 49DFG, 50C, 50H, 51AC and 51HK. Another disadvantage such as limited recline makes the seats 49DFG, 51AC and 52HK bad seats.


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